How to find the right breastfeeding position

There are many different ways you can breastfeed your baby. Alternating different breastfeeding positions will help prevent back pain and breastfeeding problems such as sore nipples or engorgement.

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The right breastfeeding position: Every beginning is difficult

Perhaps you are a little overwhelmed with breastfeeding at first. This is completely normal! Breastfeeding is not as easy as it looks. The right breastfeeding position has to be found first and at the same time the breastfeeding technique should of course be right so that your baby can drink effectively. Very important for the start of breastfeeding: Don’t let yourself be stressed! Give your baby and yourself enough time and rest to get used to breastfeeding, especially in the early days. This is particularly important for a successful breastfeeding relationship! You can easily try out different breastfeeding positions in your usual environment.

How do I find the right breastfeeding position?

There are many different ways you can breastfeed your baby. Alternating different breastfeeding positions will help prevent back pain and breastfeeding problems such as sore nipples or engorgement.

breastfeeding in the side position

This breastfeeding position is particularly recommended after caesarean sections, at night or for heavy drinkers. You lie on your side. Support your head and back with pillows until you are comfortable. Your baby is also lying on his side, with his head toward your lower breast. You can support your baby’s back with your hand or use a nursing pillow to keep your baby in the right position. You can breastfeed your baby easily from this breastfeeding position.

Breastfeeding in the cradle position

If we think of a breastfeeding woman, it is this breastfeeding position that comes to mind the most. To breastfeed in the cradle position, sit up straight. Your back and arms should be adequately supported. This is ensured by a special nursing chair or a nursing pillow. Hold your baby in the cradle position. His stomach is turned towards yours. Your baby’s neck rests in the crook of your arm, and you support your back and buttocks with your hand. Although this breastfeeding position is advisable for later and especially when you are out and about, it can quickly become uncomfortable if there is a heavy flow of milk or if you are a heavy drinker.

The correct breastfeeding position

Breastfeeding at the back

Breastfeeding in the back position is also known as the football position. With this breastfeeding position, you breastfeed your baby while sitting. Here the child lies on the side under your arm. His legs point backwards. His bum is supported by a previously placed breastfeeding pillow and is about at your elbow height. With your hand, support your baby’s head with his back resting on your forearm.

This breastfeeding position has several key advantages. It is particularly cheap after a caesarean section because the scar is spared. In addition, the football grip very effectively prevents breast engorgement. This breastfeeding position is also recommended for very large breasts or when the baby is feeding restlessly. And the decisive advantage: tandem breastfeeding is possible in the back position. This breastfeeding position is therefore advisable for mothers with twins or mothers who want to breastfeed children of different ages at the same time.

breastfeeding while sitting

This breastfeeding position is also known as the Hoppe-Reiter position. Since your baby has to be able to sit well for this, it is only suitable for older babies or small children. For seated breastfeeding, position your baby astride your lap so that their face is in front of your chest. If your treasure is quite small, you can use cushions to help. Support your baby on the back with your hand and forearm so that it can drink well. This breastfeeding position is particularly recommended if you have engorged milk or if your child has a blocked nose.

Text: Daniela Kirschbaum

Photo credit: didesign021, Dmytro Vietrov / Shutterstock.com

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